Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Lake County Past

Feb. 18, 1943

Judge points out grave peril

Municipal Judge Charles Wilkinson brought to the attention of the Chronicle the grave nature of providing persons on the liquor blacklist with liquor, either by sale or gift. It has come to his attention that many of the persons on the blacklist are provided with liquor by gift from friends. The law provides that such provision either by sale or gift is a gross misdemeanor and punishable by confinement in the state penitentiary. The intent of the law is to protect these unfortunates from themselves and to slip them a drink is equally as grave as to sell it to them. Judge Wilkinson hopes it will not be necessary to make an example of those who are guilty of this practice.

Feb. 25, 1968

A political football

Two Harbors, for the past several weeks, has become the oval spheroid in a political football game between Republicans and Democrats on both a state and national level and we hope the game is now in the final play.

The entire issue involved in the start, progress and later closing of Universal Fiberglass Corp.'s plant in Two Harbors has been hashed, rehashed and then hashed again. We think it's time to use a new roast instead.

The Chronicle & Times has neither the space nor the inclination to go back once more into the history of the now closed plant here. From our vantage point at the plant's scene of operations, we feel sure that negotiations conducted here, in St. Paul and in Washington were in good faith and we'll let it go at that.

We are concerned that with the adverse effect this political football game may have on future progress of industry in Two Harbors. We express the sincere hope that facilities formerly used by Universal Fiberglass, which was trying to fulfill a contract for a vehicle for the post office department we understand the department no longer wants anyhow, may once again be utilized. We hope that this community will continue to grow and prosper.

Bids on housing area are rejected

All bids on a low-cost housing project in Two Harbors, opened by the commission in charge of the project Feb. 7, have been rejected because they were substantially higher than the estimates of the architect.

Robert Gow, executive administrator of the project, said that it might be some time before new bids could be called on the project.

About $1 million in federal funds have been allocated to construct the building, planned for an area on First Avenue from what is now the Christian Science Church eastward across Fifth Street.

The planned structure is to be six stories and will include apartments of one and two rooms plus kitchenette space and bath facilities.

Plans for the structure have been going forward for about two years and the building facilities are designed to provide housing at a low cost primarily for senior citizens from throughout the North Shore area.

Some revisions of the proposed plans may be necessary in the light of the bids for general construction, electrical and mechanical work involved.

Advertisement