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Dixie makes a comeback

Just a year after Dixie Bar, Grill and Bottleshop suffered a devastating fire, owners Deanna and Scott Larson opened up a food trailer to continue to serve the Two Harbors area. (News-Chronicle photo by Adelle Whitefoot)1 / 3
Owner Deanna Larson works the grill in the new Dixie Food Trailer on July 13 in downtown Two Harbors. (News-Chronicle photo by Adelle Whitefoot)2 / 3
All of the menu items for the Dixie Food Trailer were served at the former restaurant, including onion rings and handmade burgers. (News-Chronicle photo by Adelle Whitefoot)3 / 3

Just a year after the Dixie Bar, Grill and Bottleshop was tragically lost in a fire, the restaurant has come back to life, but in a different form.

Owners Scott and Deanna Larson recently started the Dixie Food Trailer and it has been a hit these first few weeks.

"It has been really good. We've been having a good turnout and very good support and feedback," Deanna Larson said. "It's a lot more work than we thought, but we've been enjoying it."

Deanna Larson said they still wanted to be involved in something that was Dixie related, but they couldn't open a new full restaurant the way it was before. Food trailers and trucks are quite popular right now, so the choice to start a Dixie Food Trailer was an easy one.

"Getting back into the restaurant side of it and feeding people is my favorite part," Deanna Larson said. "I really enjoy the cooking part of it and seeing the people. It's a fun thing."

According to Larson, there has been a learning curve when it comes to operating the trailer that differs from operating a restaurant.

"It was a big learning curve as far as planning on what you are going to need to have on board because you don't just have a room to run to to grab extra items," Larson said. "It was a big learning curve on how to make it more efficient with less space. It was a huge curve on how to set it up to get the flow right."

Larson said that the prep is just as much as running a restaurant but it's harder with the trailer because there is less space.

"It's harder with the trailer because you just don't have the room for the setup and prepping. So everything is fresh day by day because of storage issues," Larson said. "The upside is that you don't have to be in a restaurant from 9 o'clock in the morning to 9 o'clock at night. With the trailer, you go setup and then your done at that time."

All the items on the menu are items that customers could have ordered at the Dixie restaurant. Those items include their signature Dixie Burger and their shrimp burger. These are the most ordered items.

"In fact, we have a hard time keeping up with that shrimp burger. We ran out the first week we were open, but now we are prepared," Larson said. "It's a recipe that we came up with on our own once one of the food distributors quit carrying one and we couldn't find a new one. That's done fresh daily as well."

Right now the Dixie Food Trailer will be out and about in Two Harbor five days a week in the summer. The trailer will consistently be parked at Castle Danger Brewer on Thursdays and Saturdays as well as at Sure-Fab in the industrial park for lunch on Tuesdays. Larson said they still don't have set locations for Wednesdays or Fridays yet.

"We will post our weekly schedule on our Facebook and Instagram on Sundays and have daily reminder updates as well," Larson said.

Dixie accepts cash as well as credit with a minimum charge of $15.

"We aren't fast food but we are trying to put the food out fast so there isn't that long of a wait," Larson said. "We definitely are not a fast food restaurant and we definitely hope that is something that people can understand that they are going to have to wait a little for a good burger."

She also said that as some point they are hoping to get their pizzas incorporated back into the menu.

"We've had a lot of questions from customers about it," Larson said. "We're not quite sure how we are going to do that yet."

For up to date information and locations follow Dixie Food Trailer on Facebook or Instagram.

Adelle Whitefoot

Adelle Whitefoot is a Michigan native who moved to Minnesota in Sept. 2014 when she started as a reporter for the News-Chronicle. She graduated from Northern Michigan University in Marquette, Mich., in 2012 with a bachelor's in English writing and has been a professional photographer since 2011. Whitefoot is the beat writer for the Two Harbors City Council and Lake Superior School District.

(218) 834-2141
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